5 Secret Cheat Many are Using to Earn $250/Article Writing Clients - Life Beyond Certificate

5 Secret Cheat Many are Using to Earn $250/Article Writing Clients

Article Writing Clients Secret Trick
Getting article writing clients could be a daunting task for many. Never mind, coz I will show you the exact trick many are using to land tons of clients for their business. Welcome to our blog today. It’s also fully beginner-friendly, which is wonderful news.I won’t lie; I haven’t exactly been the shining example of a successful freelance writer. When they’veonly been freelancing for a year or six months, you see all those other excellent writers online showing you screenshots of their $10,000/month revenue statements. Well done to them, but if you’re anything like me, you’ve probably never had such great success.

My four-year freelance anniversary is on February 6th, 2022, and I’ve only recently begun to exceed
$2,000 each month. After three years of failing and restarting, I this year finally began to notice the
results. I’m not sure if that makes me a poor or an average freelance writer, but in any case, I’ve
developed a system for finding clients who would pay well, and I wanted to share it with you today.

A Caution


Call me gullible or naive all you want, but I’ve only recently come to the conclusion that the majority of
writing industry advice is nonsense. Do you desire to know the cause? Nothing about it involves other
authors deceiving you.

My best buddy recently forwarded me a TikTok video of a girl who instructs others on how to earn
money online. To make a $10,000 month as a freelancer, she advised applying to 10 projects on Upwork
every day until you found ten clients who were willing to pay $1,000 each month.

I don’t think it is awful counsel, you understand. However, each freelancer’s journey is so unique and
personal that it’s challenging to promote a single guaranteed method of earning money. Going to
Upwork and getting 10 clients paying $1,000/month might work for one person. If the time, the state of
the economy, or the phase of the moon were off, it might not work for another writer.

I can’t stress enough that even if you strictly abide by my recommendations, your results may still differ
even though I’m giving the formula that has served me well and still does.

After the warning is through, we can move on to the interesting part:

The formula for a $250 per article client
What you’ll require
Internet access (obviously, of course. It’s not like we can deliver handwritten letters to potential
customers in the form of owls.)
Gmail will do as long as the address is not sweetcherry666@gmail.com for professional email.
Email locator (I recommend either Hunter or Norbert)
If you prefer to take notes on paper, use a note app or notepad.
3 to 6 hours from you
Just a little common sense

Step-By-Step Guidelines: Getting Article Writing Clients

Step 1: Make a list of potential customers in your industry.


You’re not required to focus on a single niche. To simplify the process, you should be able to divide the
clients into groups so that you won’t have to compose the cold pitch from scratch each time. If you are
familiar with the cold pitching game, you undoubtedly already have a list in your possession.

But if you’re new, don’t be concerned. Prospective clients are quite simple to find. Start by searching for
“[your specialty] brands/companies” on Google:
There are a ton of articles you may read to identify companies you might wish to collaborate with. Write
them all down on paper or in a Google Docs spreadsheet.

Step 2: Locate Contacts


It’s time to put your sleuthing abilities to work. Find the companies on your list first by going to LinkedIn.
To stay in touch and up to date, I frequently follow company pages. However, you can omit this step if
you don’t use LinkedIn.

The person in charge of content is the ideal individual to find. If you chose major companies, there is
probably a designated someone who is either a Content Manager or Head of Content. Locate a
marketing professional, preferably a marketing manager or head of marketing, for smaller businesses. If
no one in marketing is available, speak with the CEO or co-founder directly.

Use the email finder tools to locate their emails after you have their names, then record the information
in your spreadsheet or notes.

Step 3: Review Client Blogs and Compile a List of Potential Blog Post Pitches.

The most challenging step is going to be this one. The pain will be great. You will curse the universe,
your mother, your cousin, and yourself. But it has to be finished.

This stage is essential because you want to demonstrate to the client that you are knowledgeable about
their industry. that you are aware of their identity, activities, and needs. This is your opportunity to
prove to the customer that you are capable of doing the task even though you lack experience if you are
a novice without references, a portfolio, or any other form of credibility.

For each customer, I personally make three pitches. I start by browsing their blog. Second, I use Google
and their website to conduct some keyword searches. This is crucial since occasionally, when using their
built-in website search, articles don’t come up. Additionally, you don’t want to pitch the customer on
already published articles.

Then, I pen a couple suggestions that I believe will complement their blog. For your pitches, don’t bother
producing 500-word essays. Be succinct, direct, and to the point. Two to three sentence pitches, in my
opinion, are more than sufficient. Making your message clear fast is also a wonderful habit that is always
beneficial to writers.

Step 4: Create the Pitch and Click “Send”


You simply need to construct the pitch and send it once you have the pitches for the client’s blog. Online
pitch templates abound, and each writer will claim that theirs is the greatest and always effective. I’m
not sure if mine is excellent. But it did get me my clients, so it must be working in some way.
This cold pitch, in my opinion, makes three crucial points:

who I am
How can I help them?
what makes them important
Because every writer is different and you can have a different set of abilities or experiences, you’ll
probably want to make adjustments to yours as you go. My pitch template is quite simple because I
exclusively provide blog post writing services to the sexual health sector.

In addition, I make sure to choose three items from my portfolio that best suit each client’s blog when I
email them. I choose the greatest articles from my backlog based on the topics, tone of voice, and
organization.

Step 5: Take Action


Everyone is busy. People frequently receive pitches from other independent writers in their inboxes.
They may have read your email but neglected to respond. Because of this, if they don’t respond, you
should gently prod them. Now, the word “gently” is essential here. Don’t keep emailing the client daily
to see if they have read your email.

The majority of advise suggests twice following up. every seven days, once. then once more after
another week. Personally, I only check in once, usually a week later. Those that are interested will
respond following the initial follow-up, in my experience, and those who are not will either ignore you or
politely respond “no.”

Results

So what should the outcome be if you use my exclusive recipe? Ideally, a clientele of loyal, $250 per
item, long-term customers. At the end of the day, isn’t that what it means to be a freelancer?

I am aware that many independent contractors detest cold pitching. Instead of focusing on developing
their own brand so that clients may find them, they would prefer to go ask their friends for
recommendations. If you didn’t already know, I prefer cold pitching to other techniques, thus I employ
this recipe myself, and it is effective. For further readings on Getting Article Writing Clients, you can order our book on Freelance Mastery.