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Empowering The Child

1,500.00

Most parents feel inadequate, perhaps for good reason, but that doesn’t mean that parents can’t learn the skills they need to be more effective in their task. And you may not realize this, but your child really does want you to succeed as a parent. Your children may never tell you, but rest assured that they are as interested in your success in parenting as you are.

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Most parents feel inadequate to empowering their child, perhaps for good reason, but that doesn’t mean that parents can’t learn the skills they need to be more effective in their task. And you may not realize this, but your child really does want you to succeed as a parent. Your children may never tell you, but rest assured that they are as interested in your success in parenting as you are.

So what will you learn in “Empowering the Child”?

  • How to really nurture your child
  • How to praise and when to criticize
  • How to demonstrate and practice unconditional love
  • The difficulty of setting rules and why they are so important
  • The value of dedicated time with your child
  • Learning the best way to carry on a conversation
  • What to build into your child’s life now to ensure lifelong success
  • And much more.

We can’t cover every possible thing that you’ll need to know as a parent, but the lessons you’ll learn when you get your copy of “Empowering the Child” will get you started down the right road. Believe me, you’ll be glad that you learn these lessons and put them into practice.

Listen and Empathize 

Sometimes children are not expecting us to help and all they need is a listening ear. Practice listening when your child vents to you about a problem. If needed, take deep breaths as you fight the urge to jump in with solutions.

Next time your child comes to you with a problem, try one of the following responses.

  • Provide choices, such as, “Would you like to keep trying, take a break, or ask for help?”
  • Validate your child’s feelings: “You seem frustrated. I understand why you feel that way.”
  • Ask your child open-ended questions such as, “How do you think you can solve this?” or, “What solutions have you tried? What else could you try?” Brainstorm together, but let your child take the lead. Don’t push an agenda.
  • If your child is truly stuck, you can try prompting with questions like, “What do you think would happen if you tried ________?”
  • You can also ask, “What do you need from me?” This tells your child that you are there for them in a supporting role, but still gives them ownership and agency..

2. Model the Attitude You Want to See

When you encounter challenges yourself, model the same language and attitude you’d like to see from your child.

  • Use phrases like, “This is hard. I need a break,” or, “This is hard. I’m going to keep trying.” You may also say, “This is hard. Will you help me?”
  • Ask your child to help you brainstorm solutions to your problem or challenge.
  • Avoid expressing negative opinions of yourself or making comments like, “I can’t do this.” Take deep breaths and tell yourself, “I can handle this, if you’re losing your composure.
  • Focus on the positive. Was a lesson learned? Did you improve? Did you overcome the struggle — and how great did it feel?